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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
there are maybe two categories of copulation. those having political power. it is a matter of foreign policy. the other category deals with millions of people for which you have information from private service providers. you can ask them to provide information before providing it to the nsa. first, you have the harvest everything. this is under the category of population outside the scope of international security. which is quite wider than other countries. it is not a solution that we have in europe, and that is why when we see this data collected, we cannot only think of fighting against terrorism, but also thinking about offering things like that. >> we say it is about stopping terrorists, but is it about having a competitive edge, trolling for consumer behaviors and getting an edge on the competition in an economic war rather than a war on terrorism? >> everybody is paying everybody. they collect data. imagine 42% increase since 2010. everybody is collaborating with this kind of cyber espionage and criminality. it is not a question of one or the other, everyone is doing that. in 2012, t
supporting our foreign policy and national security objectives that we are more effectively weighing the risks and rewards of our activities that we are focused above all on threats to the american people. we need to ensure are collecting information not just because we can but because we should. because we need it for our security. so again, i won't go on too long. i think it's important top context you'llize some of these revelations to look at what the administration is doing to review our intelligence activities and to look at how we balance the need for security in this completely transformed world that we live in because of the technology advances that have occurred. and then against, as i said earlier, the clear and real privacy concerns that americans and people around the world share. >> you just mentioned that it's important for us to make sure that our intelligence gathering above all is about protecting american security and you and the president in the past have talked about the nsa really being focused on things like terrorism, proliferation of wmds. can au sure our all
frank discussions. mark, you and i have covered foreign policy a long time. this is a very unhappy group of people. to a certain extent there's spying everywhere. we know that. it's a little shock. there's gambling at mr. rick's. the germans want the same special relationship of no spying agreement that we have with the uk. at the same time, i think there really is anger about they said the flash point was merkel's cell phone. >> yeah, i think that's right, andrea. it's not just anger but embarrassment on their part. remember, the first allegations of potential nsa surveillance in europe came up during the summer. at the time the germans were among those saying we understand it. we think as a dispute it's ebbing away. our concerns have been more or less met. i think there's now a feeling they climbed down and didn't make a huge case out of it in the summer only to find out it was more persuasive, lasted longer and involved the top official and their government. so they have a lot of egg on their own face. what was interesting about the long article der spiegel published over the weekend,
foreign policy or national security rate policy, except that president obama this does seem to be having any luck getting the iranians to scale back their nuclear program by there. >> what the majority of americans of feeling. so frustrated over the middle east. lou: i don't see that reflected in the polls. >> afghanistan. we keep having them in this area. >> i think the next person to run a war in the middle east is going to probably -- that might just be something that we create political consequence for in this country. lou: barack obama. by the way, is constrained in that regard, i think, is absolutely appropriate. >> i take you are not exactly comfortable with farming at the end game to the russians. >> no. the matter of fact, i think that the endgame is a fool's game. we have watch it for 60 years. it is time for this country and others, would point specifically to the europeans to start taking a different approach. we talk about real, real human lives will we talk to us in the air trips to the middle east. we are seeing an abject fools recommend long distance wars that are bloodle
american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can add spain to the list of countries that are demanding answers. the newest details emerge in this spanish newspaper "el mundo" reporting that phone calls from surveye survei. over the weekend came news that the nsa has been monitoring calls from german chancellor angela merkel as far back a as 2002. >> i think the most important thing is to find a basis for the future on which we can operate, and as i said today trust needs to be rebuilt which implies that trust has been severely shaken, and the members of the european union share these concerns today. true change is necessary. >> reporter: when barack obama was running for president in 2008 he went to german and pledged a new era of u
states to our conduct of foreign policy, to the defense matters, to economic matters. and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> and the full interview with dick cheney going to air this afternoon on the lead with jake tapper at 4:00 p.m. eastern. you're not going to want to miss that. also want to bring in christiane amanpour in the london news room talking about the nsa, the spying, of course, the aftermath of the allies really upset about this. one thing you said earlier today that really struck us here is that you said there was a deficit of good will among u.s. allies. and that's part of the reason why they are so so frustrated and angry right now. why is there a deficit of good will among our allies? >> well, it's interesting you just played that clip of former vice president cheney. let's go back to the cheney/bush years which april pex was all the angst and anger over the unite at the iraq
allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are important and need to be preserved. >>
of the faith. i came to realise that islamism was a grievance. up until that point i was aggrieved by foreign policy. islamism was the largest obstacle preventing muslim societies from progressing. i was someone driven by a sense of injustice. i wanted to seek for justice. that would entail challenging the islamist ideology. if i realised that it was an obstacle to the advancement of muslim society. we grounded quinn lamb. >> we have a question from a huer. >>> jd rosen asks is reduction of drone war fair an effective countermeasure against new extremist recruitment? >> so i've been critical of uab, drone strikes. if the policy is carrick cattured as democracy at the barrel of the gun, was bush's stance. if the leadership of al qaeda was dealt with by drone strikes, president obama felt he could deal with the problem. it's an ideology, an inurgency, not just an organization. president obama's organization said al qaeda inspired terrorist. it's the end product. >> you write in reference to al qaeda - you can't kill an idea. ideas are bulletproof. what is it that the united states can do. what
, american foreign policy towards syria. the meeting, the deputy prime minister re-engagement with elements of the assad regime and shows americans deep involved and engagement in pushing for a political settlement inside syria. interesting developments there. i want to move on and talk about the meeting between peace envoy lakhdar brahimi, who was expected to hold talks with president assad. lakhdar brahimi says he has seen assad playing a role in a new syria, but not as a leader. do you think this is something assad is likely to agree to? >> not at all. in fact, not only assad would not agree to what mr lakhdar brahimi publicly stated, lakhdar brahimi yesterday tried to distance himself from his own announcement on syrian television, saying the statement was taken out of context. president assad warned lakhdar brahimi to stay faithful to his mission, not to make any statements outside of his mission. the reality is that there is a stalemate in the syrian crisis. the reality is the syrian opposition is divided. the assad regime is not going to make a compromise or really give the oppositio
interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world leaders. take a listen to this. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states but also in france and germany and throughout europe. and we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> so, mark, we have allies that are upset with
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
in broad daylight. >>> president obama is hearing tough new criticism of his foreign policy. in an interview yesterday former vice president dick cheney said he doesn't trust the president -- trust the president to stand behind israel and keep nuclear weapons out of iran. >> you don't believe he has the best interests of the united states in terms of our national security in the middle east? >> i don't believe he does. >> you don't believe his word can be trusted? >> correct. >> that's a serious question. >> it certainly is. >> to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> in a democratic country. >> but i think this president is doing enormous damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. the last time we walked away from afghanistan, for example, back in the '80s, we'd been there heavily involved supporting the move against the soviets but then we turned around after the soviets departed. they got a civil war and osa
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
of what we are to collect and analyze. >> why would that be important for policy makers to know what the intentions of foreign leaders may or may not be? >> well, for one, to determine if what they are there the intelligence perspective if what they are saying jells with what is going on. it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are. how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. so and it isn't just leaders themselves. policies they can convey to governments. >> and -- it's certainly in my time since being in this business as an fbi at, and since 2004 on this committee, always found that the best way to determine a foreign leaders intentions is to somehow either get close to a foreign leader or actually get communications of a foreign leaders would that be accurate? >> yes, it would. >> and is say for how many years you have been in the intelligence business. is in something new and different, that the intelligence can chart. to try to determine what the best policy may be for the united states of america. >> it's one of the first
foreign leaders' intentions to dry to determine the best policy for the united states of america? >> it's one of the first things i learned in intelligence school in 1983 that this is the fundmental given in the intelligence business is leadership intentions, no matter what level you're talking about. that can be military leaders as well. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service, our leaders, or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with a story recently from the former french head of the direct -- well, the dcri -- are you familiar with that? >> that's the french domestic intelligence organization. >> let me read you a quote from that gentleman. quote, i'm amazed by such disconcerning naivety, he said in the interview. you'd think the politicians don't read reports they get from the intelligence services. he's talking about french spying on our allies including the united states of america. do you find that consistent with what you know as director of the nationa
intelligence or suspected foreign agents. >> one major point was made to surveillance policies, saying everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating report
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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